• 26th September
    2014
  • 26
Words can’t even explain!! I’m so honored to be the new Chapter President of Beta Xi Psi of ΦΘΚ ☺️ I can’t wait to work with the new officers! #PTK #ΦΘΚ #greeklife 💁😂

Words can’t even explain!! I’m so honored to be the new Chapter President of Beta Xi Psi of ΦΘΚ ☺️ I can’t wait to work with the new officers! #PTK #ΦΘΚ #greeklife 💁😂

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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
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stigninger:

Alive Youthful Hercules

I have tried to imagine how could look the classic marble sculptures, if they were real persons. And I used the technique like oil painting for recreate it, and then, I made a GIF. I’m very proud of the result!

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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
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yungvermeer:

A Walk Through Art History


I designed these shoes with a unique goal in mind: to create a shoe as a summation of an entire culture’s art. Each shoe possesses design qualities, color palettes, and designs only found in the respective culture. This project allowed me to investigate art historical cultures in a special way by challenging myself to translate an entire style (or series of styles) onto a single object.

Conveniently, I was able to use these designs as the concentration section of my AP Studio Art portfolio and received a score of a 5! 

 I possess full federal copyright of these designs. 

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  • 25th September
    2014
  • 25
im-not-mine:

John William Waterhouse, The Danaides, 1903.

In Greek mythology, the Danaids, Danaides or Danaïdes, were the fifty daughters of Danaus. They were to marry the fifty sons of Danaus’s twin brother Aegyptus, a mythical king of Egypt. In the most common version of the myth, all but one of them killed their husbands on their wedding night, and are condemned to spend eternity carrying water in a sieve or perforated device. In the classical tradition, they come to represent the futility of a repetitive task that can never be completed.
Danaus did not want his daughters to go ahead with the marriages and he fled with them in the first boat to Argos, which is located in Greece near the ancient city of Mycenae.
Danaus agreed to the marriage of his daughters only after Aegyptus came to Argos with his fifty sons in order to protect the local population, the Argives, from any battles. The daughters were ordered by their father to kill their husbands on the first night of their weddings and this they all did with the exception of one, Hypermnestra, who spared her husband Lynceus because he respected her desire to remain a virgin. Danaus was angered that his daughter refused to do as he ordered and took her to the Argives courts. Lynceus killed Danaus as revenge for the death of his brothers and he and Hypermnestra started the Danaid Dynasty of rulers in Argos.
The other forty-nine daughters remarried by choosing their mates in footraces. Some accounts tell that their punishment was in Tartarus being forced to carry a jug to fill a bathtub without a bottom (or with a leak) to wash their sins off. Because the water was always leaking they would forever try to fill the tub. Probably this myth is connected with a ceremony having to do with the worship of waters, and the Danaides were water-nymphs. 

im-not-mine:

John William Waterhouse, The Danaides, 1903.

In Greek mythology, the Danaids, Danaides or Danaïdes, were the fifty daughters of Danaus. They were to marry the fifty sons of Danaus’s twin brother Aegyptus, a mythical king of Egypt. In the most common version of the myth, all but one of them killed their husbands on their wedding night, and are condemned to spend eternity carrying water in a sieve or perforated device. In the classical tradition, they come to represent the futility of a repetitive task that can never be completed.

Danaus did not want his daughters to go ahead with the marriages and he fled with them in the first boat to Argos, which is located in Greece near the ancient city of Mycenae.

Danaus agreed to the marriage of his daughters only after Aegyptus came to Argos with his fifty sons in order to protect the local population, the Argives, from any battles. The daughters were ordered by their father to kill their husbands on the first night of their weddings and this they all did with the exception of one, Hypermnestra, who spared her husband Lynceus because he respected her desire to remain a virgin. Danaus was angered that his daughter refused to do as he ordered and took her to the Argives courts. Lynceus killed Danaus as revenge for the death of his brothers and he and Hypermnestra started the Danaid Dynasty of rulers in Argos.

The other forty-nine daughters remarried by choosing their mates in footraces. Some accounts tell that their punishment was in Tartarus being forced to carry a jug to fill a bathtub without a bottom (or with a leak) to wash their sins off. Because the water was always leaking they would forever try to fill the tub. Probably this myth is connected with a ceremony having to do with the worship of waters, and the Danaides were water-nymphs. 

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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
  • 25
I think everything in life is art. What you do. How you dress. The way you love someone, and how you talk. Your smile and your personality. What you believe in, and all your dreams. The way you drink your tea. How you decorate your home. Or party. Your grocery list. The food you make. How your writing looks. And the way you feel. Life is art.
Helena Bonham Carter (via twinrae)
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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
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moonisupidontgiveafuck:

stop romanticizing mental illness.

it isn’t “cool”

it doesn’t make you “more interesting”

it doesn’t make you “deeper”

it doesn’t make you any more attractive in any way.

it just fucks your life up a lot

i wouldn’t wish any illness upon my worst enemy. 

stop fucking turning it into a fashion trend.

(via dontpanics)

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  • 25th September
    2014
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  • 25th September
    2014
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